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Step into the future with these great deals on Samsung and Vizio 4K TVs

Bored out of your mind because of the new need to stay at home? Starting to despise watching shows on your tiny old TV? Maybe it’s time to upgrade to 4K so you can binge-watch the latest Netflix shows in glorious high definition. And you don’t even have to spend too much money on one as we’ve found these quality 4K TV deals at Walmart that cost as little as $295. Save as much as $120 when you get the Samsung NU6900 and Vizio M-Series 4K TVs today.

Samsung NU6900 4K TV — from $295

The Samsung NU6900 is a decent entry-level 4K TV from the South Korean megabrand. Samsung is mostly known for its premium quantum-dot (QLED) TVs, but if you’re on a tight budget and don’t mind a few compromises, this is the TV for you. The NU6900 is made almost entirely of plastic, but it looks surprisingly chic. Its two attachable feet are spaced a bit far apart from each other, but they do provide rock-solid support. Even with a playful kid around, it would take tremendous force to knock this TV over. On the back side is a strip of grooves that, upon closer inspection, are actually meant for cable management and aren’t merely decorative. They hide the cables for power, HDMI, and coaxial connections from plain sight, although it isn’t nearly as seamless as Samsung’s One Connect Box wires concealment. Again, you’ll have to look into one of Samsung’s QLED offerings for this high-end feature. Unfortunately, there are only two HDMI inputs on this TV, which means you can only connect two devices at once.

This TV’s standard edge-lit LCD display boasts 3,840 x 2,160 Ultra HD resolution and supports HDR, including HDR10+, Samsung’s proprietary high-dynamic range format. The picture quality is good. For an inexpensive set, we were surprised at the NU6900’s excellent contrast ratio that makes deep blacks look great in a dark room. It’s not suitable for bright rooms, though, as it can’t get very bright, but it does have decent reflection handling. Unfortunately, colors look a little muted and accuracy is a bit off. This is not the most vibrant TV we’ve seen, and frankly, for the price, we didn’t expect it to be. The same goes for viewing angles, as even a slight movement off the center axis would make the picture fade to gray. At least the input lag is low, making this TV good for gaming.

Samsung’s SmartThings TV interface remains one of its strongest suits. You’ll have easy access to all your favorite apps, and what’s more, there are constantly new additions to Samsung’s already immense app ecosystem, most recently including iTunes. But unlike Tizen, Samsung’s other smart TV interface that’s reserved for its more expensive models, the NU6900 lacks voice assistant integration. You can, however, connect it to a separate Alexa device if you want to.

If you need a solid but budget-friendly 4K TV, the Samsung NU6900 should be right up your alley. Yes, its picture performance left us a bit wanting, but its incredibly low price tag is very hard to resist. Get a 50-inch unit of the NU6900 on Walmart for $295 instead of $328, or $478 for a 65-inch unit.

50-inch Samsung NU6900 4K TV:

65-inch Samsung NU6900 4K TV:

55-inch Vizio M-Series Quantum 4K TV — $380, was $500

The Vizio M-Series Quantum’s design is typically minimalist as with the most recent 4K TVs. The bezel that surrounds the screen is incredibly slim and is only slightly thicker at the bottom. It is supported by two boomerang-shaped legs, which are detachable should you wish to mount this TV on your wall. Behind it are two sets of ports, one facing right and the other facing downward. There are four HDMI ports (one of them offers an audio-return channel that’s optimized for soundbars), one USB port, one optical port, RCA jacks, a port for HD antennas, and an Ethernet port for network connection. Sadly, this TV doesn’t support a Bluetooth connection, so you need to have some sort of plug-in adapter to use wireless headphones.

This TV’s quantum dots work together to deliver a picture with boosted brightness and a full-array local dimming (FALD) for extreme contrasts — the blacks are inky black and the brights are beautifully bright. It supports both HDR10 and Dolby Vision, so it’s capable of a wider spectrum of colors and details. Overall, its picture quality is simply sensational for something that costs less than $1,000.

Surprisingly, this TV’s built-in speakers deliver audio that is quite decent despite being so slim. The bass is punchy but won’t make furniture vibrate, the dialogue is extremely audible, and the volume can easily fill a small-to-medium-sized room.

Unfortunately, Vizio’s remote control remains frustratingly unevolved, with far too many buttons. It does its job well, but it’s not as wonderfully simple as a Roku or Samsung remote. The same can be said for its smart TV system. It runs with SmartCast 3.0 and is comparatively faster than older Vizio TVs but still slower than a Roku. The interface looks well-organized and polished, and it has built-in Chromecast, but you cannot add new apps on it.

The Vizio M-Series Quantum offers the ultimate TV viewing experience on a shoestring budget, thanks to a bright and colorful display that truly stuns. Unfortunately, it runs with the sluggish SmartCast 3.0 interface and comes with a frustratingly primitive remote. But seriously, you can overlook these things as it really delivers where it matters most. Get this 4K TV for $380 instead of $500 on Walmart – a huge $120 worth of savings.

Looking for more? Visit our curated deals page for more 4K TV deals.

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