Skip to main content

Wyze camera breach allows strangers to peer into others’ homes

Wyze has built a following by offering reasonably priced smart security cameras and other gadgets for the home, and the company generally enjoys a good reputation among its customers.

But another security breach, this one in recent days, is sure to test some customers’ trust in the company. The latest incident involved around 13,000 Wyze customers receiving images and video from Wyze cameras that didn’t belong to them.

The issue appears to be linked to an outage that impacted Wyze cameras at the tail end of last week. The Seattle-based company blamed the disruption to its service on an issue with cloud company Amazon Web Services (AWS), though it didn’t offer specific details. It was following the outage, as Wyze worked to get its service back up and running, that customers started to see imagery from other people’s cameras.

Realizing the mishap, Wyze sent its customers an email on Monday explaining that around 13,000 accounts had received thumbnail images from Wyze cameras belonging to other customers.

“We can now confirm that as cameras were coming back online, about 13,000 Wyze users received thumbnails from cameras that were not their own and 1,504 users tapped on them,” Wyze said in its email, which was shared by The Verge. “Most taps enlarged the thumbnail, but in some cases an Event Video was able to be viewed.”

Wyze explained in its email that the incident was caused by “a third-party caching client library that was recently integrated into our system. This client library received unprecedented load conditions caused by devices coming back online all at once. As a result of increased demand, it mixed up device ID and user ID mapping and connected some data to incorrect accounts.”

The company said that more than 99.75% of Wyze accounts were not affected by the security event.

It added in its email that to ensure the breach isn’t repeated, it has added a new layer of verification before users are connected to Event Videos, among other measures.

Wyze has been hit by such troubling issues in the past, including an incident similar to this most recent one. But in its email to customers, it insisted that security is a “top priority” for the company, adding: “We are so sorry for this incident and are dedicated to rebuilding your trust.”

Editors' Recommendations

Trevor Mogg
Contributing Editor
Not so many moons ago, Trevor moved from one tea-loving island nation that drives on the left (Britain) to another (Japan)…
How to prevent your Ring smart camera from being hacked
Ring Indoor Cam on a table.

Ring smart cameras are remarkably popular. The lineup includes a variety of indoor and outdoor cameras as well as an industry-leading catalog of video doorbells. However, the cameras aren't without their faults. A few years ago, a class action lawsuit was filed claiming that Ring hadn't done enough to protect users from hackers -- allowing them to gain unpermitted access to video feeds.

Digital Trends reached out to Ring about these old hacking incidents. Here's what they had to say.

Read more
Wyze Cam Floodlight vs. Wyze Cam Floodlight v2: What’s new about this updated security camera?
A person adjusting the Wyze Cam Floodlight v2.

The Wyze Cam Floodlight was a great choice for frugal shoppers, and its successor, the Wyze Cam Floodlight v2, is looking to carry on that legacy. The updated security camera picked up several new features -- but is it a better product? More importantly, is it worth upgrading your old Wyze Cam Floodlight to the shiny new Wyze Cam Floodlight v2? Here's a closer look at the smart home gadgets to help you decide.
Pricing and monthly fees

The Wyze Cam Floodlight v1 costs $94 and is available in white. The new Wyze Cam Floodlight v2 is (surprisingly) cheaper at $84, with a launch day promotion dropping it to just $54. It's available in both white and black.

Read more
Wyze Cam Floodlight v2 adds tons of new features at a lower price tag
The Wyze Cam Floodlight v2 on a wall.

The existing Wyze Cam Floodlight was already an easy recommendation for shoppers on a budget, as it features 2600-lumen LEDs, an expandable microSD card slot, and a 130-degree viewing angle for less than $100. Wyze is making several changes with the newly launched Wyze Cam Floodlight v2, and it offers big improvements over its predecessor, yet carries a smaller price tag.

The Wyze Cam Floodlight v2 doesn't look much different (the central camera unit has been streamlined, though it's still flanked by two massive lights), but it features plenty of enhanced specs. The big selling point is its new 2K camera, which allows it to capture vibrant images at all times of the day, along with color night vision when the sun goes down. Wyze also improved its viewing angle from 130 degrees to 160 degrees, providing additional coverage for large properties.

Read more