Samsung SyncMaster BX2450 Review

Samsung’s LED-backlit SyncMaster BX2450 achieves surprising picture quality for the price, but awkward controls can make it tough to tweak.
Samsung’s LED-backlit SyncMaster BX2450 achieves surprising picture quality for the price, but awkward controls can make it tough to tweak.
Samsung’s LED-backlit SyncMaster BX2450 achieves surprising picture quality for the price, but awkward controls can make it tough to tweak.

Highs

  • Thin, lightweight design
  • Stylish, modern bezel design
  • Snappy 2ms refresh rate eliminates motion blur
  • Bright, efficient LED backlight

Lows

  • Unresponsive touch controls and kludgy menus
  • No VESA mount, USB hub or built-in speakers
  • Exhibits light banding in gradients

Green doesn’t have to mean garbage. While eco-friendly cars, cat litter and cleaners all leave us yearning for the Earth-devastating originals, monitors actually seem to get better as they get greener. Exhibit A: Samsung’s BX2450. The 24-inch, LED-backlit display offers similar performance to its CCFL-lit competitors, but gets thinner, lighter, and consumes only 27 watts instead of 48 watts, for an impressive electric reduction of 43 percent, while keeping image quality a priority.

samsung syncmaster bx2450 reviewFeatures and Specs

The BX2450 is a 24-inch, 1080p display and the largest in Samsung’s 50 LED series, which also includes 23-, 22-, 20- and 19-inch models. The 50 LED series fills a practical niche above the 31 series LED displays, which lack the high-end Touch of Color bezel, and below the 70 LED series, which steps up the level of many of its televisions in both design and specs. All three use LED back lighting for instant-on brightness, power efficiency, and to accommodate their ultra-slim designs. The BX2450 weighs a feathery 8.8 pounds and measures only about three quarters of an inch thick, making it light enough (though it’s not necessarily advisable) to pick up with one hand.

The LCD panel on the BX2450 offers 250 cd/㎡ brightness, 2ms response times, and displays 16.7 million colors, with a claimed viewing angle of 170 degrees horizontal and 160 vertical.

Besides the benefits of LED lighting, Samsung has packed the BX2450 with many high-end features including Magic Angle for compensating for off-angle viewing, Magic Eco to automatically turn down the brightness in dim environments, and Magic Return, which bounces the content from a second monitor to the first in the event it loses signal.

Design

Samsung’s inky Touch of Color designs have pushed its TVs to the top of many style-savvy wishlists in recent years, and the BX2450 follows in the same artfully tread footsteps.

Rather than throwing a black plastic rim around the display and calling it a day, Samsung surrounds the opaque bezel with an overcoat of clear plastic that gives it a three-dimensional look, and at over a quarter inch thick, a nice solid feel, too. On the back, the black base blends into a scalloped plastic surface almost reminiscent of a woodcut.

samsung syncmaster bx2450 reviewThe real eye-catcher, though, is the mirror-polished stand that shoots down to the desk and splays out at 45 degrees in either direction. A quick tap will unfortunately reveal that it’s not real metal, but it pulls off a reasonable likeness and from a practical perspective, no one but the Dwight Schrutes of the world will be any wiser.

Ports and accessories

Around back, the BX2450 offers a single VGA port and dual HDMI ports, along with an analog audio output. We typically bemoan the lack of DVI in a desktop monitor, but Samsung also packages the display with a HDMI to DVI cable to ease compatibility woes. There’s a VGA cable in there too, guaranteeing you can hook the SyncMaster up to just about anything. The box also includes microfiber cloth for keeping the bezel clean, a CD with drivers and Samsung’s MagicTune software, and a thin paper setup manual.

Although the SyncMaster lies a step above budget-level displays, it’s a consumer monitor and lacks many of the extras you might find on a more business-oriented one, like a USB hub, built-in speakers, or even a VESA wall mount.

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