Skip to main content

How to undo changes in Keynote on Mac

With Keynote on Mac, you can create brilliant presentations for business, education, and even personal projects. But not everything goes as planned when you build a slideshow. You may add an image, type text, or make a formatting change that you wish you hadn’t.

With the Undo feature in Keynote, you can erase your last action. Whether you add an element you want to immediately remove or make a formatting change that doesn’t work out, Undo is your digital eraser in Keynote.

Difficulty

Easy

Duration

5 minutes

What You Need

  • Mac computer

  • Apple Keynote app

Edit, Undo Typing in the Mac menu bar.
Image used with permission by copyright holder

Undo your last action in Keynote

If you want to undo the last action you performed in Keynote on Mac, select Edit > Undo in the menu bar.

To confirm you’re undoing what you intend, you’ll also see what that last action was. As an example, if you just typed a word, it would show Undo Typing; if you deleted an image, it would show Undo Delete.

When you select Undo, you should see that the last action is undone.

If you prefer to use a keyboard shortcut instead of the menu bar, press Command + Z to undo an action.

Edit, Undo Insert in the Mac menu bar.
Image used with permission by copyright holder

Undo your last several actions

The Undo feature in Keynote isn’t just a one-time eraser. You can continue to undo previous actions.

For example, let’s say you insert a shape and then type text inside of it. When you select Edit, you’ll see Undo Typing because that was the last action. If you select that and then go back to Edit, you’ll then see Undo Insert because that action came before the typing.

The key is that you can continue to undo each previous action in order. However, you cannot jump to specific actions in between.

If you use the keyboard shortcut mentioned above, Command + Z, you can continue to press this key combination to undo each action in order.

Edit, Redo Insert in the Mac menu bar.
Image used with permission by copyright holder

Redo your last action in Keynote

The counterpart to Undo in Keynote is Redo. Redo is like the eraser for the eraser that lets you redo something you just undid.

For instance, let’s say you insert a table on your slide, change your mind, and select Edit > Undo Insert to remove the table. You can then go to Edit > Redo Insert to put the table back.

Redo works just like the Undo feature. You’ll see the last action next to it in the menu and can continue to redo each action you previously undid.

If you prefer to use a keyboard shortcut instead of the menu bar, press Shift + Command + Z to redo an action. Like the keyboard shortcut for Undo, you can continue to press this key combination to redo each action in order.

Undo and Redo grayed out.
Image used with permission by copyright holder

Undo or Redo grayed out?

If you select Edit in the menu bar with the intent to undo or redo an action and one or both are grayed out, there’s a reason: There are no further actions to undo or redo.

Additionally, if you close your presentation and reopen it, you won’t have the Undo or Redo options until you perform a new action. You can save your presentation and still use Undo or Redo, but once you close the slideshow, you’ll start a new set of actions when you reopen it.

Editors' Recommendations

Sandy Writtenhouse
Sandy has been writing about technology since 2012. Her work has appeared on How-To Geek, Lifewire, MakeUseOf, iDownloadBlog…
How to change where screenshots are saved on a Mac
how to change where screenshots are saved on a mac apple screenshot

With the right keyboard shortcuts, taking a screenshot on a Mac is very straightforward -- although they don't always save to the right location. Fortunately, there are a number of locations you can choose from and selecting from them is as quick and easy as taking a screenshot in the first place.

Here's how to choose where screenshots are savedon a Mac.

Read more
How to change your MAC address on Windows and Mac
The TP-Link Archer AXE7800 tri-band Wi-Fi 6E router in a room.

Each and every web-connected component in your household has a MAC address. One can think of these 12-digit identifiers as digital name tags that computers, smartphones, tablets, and smart TVs use to say “present” on our home Wi-Fi networks. MAC addresses are also integral in maintaining a safe and reliable gateway to the internet.

Read more
How to check the storage space on your Mac
The About This Mac window showing storage usage, alongside a window offering suggestions on how to save storage spce in MacOS Monterey.

Upgrading storage on your Mac isn't always easy, or even possible, so knowing how much storage space you have, and how to free up more, is a great idea. Often when you buy a Mac, that's the storage you're stuck with -- although external drives and cloud storage are always an option.

Luckily, checking your available storage -- and then freeing up space for the things you want to keep -- is very easy to do. In this guide, we’ll walk you through the process of checking your Mac’s storage space, then show you a few quick ways of clearing out the junk you no longer need.

Read more