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A fix for slow NVMe SSD speeds in Windows 11 is out — here’s how to get it

An issue has been plaguing some Windows 11 users where NVMe drives might be running slower than expected, but Microsoft has now acknowledged the problem and issued a fix. As part of the latest Windows 11 monthly preview update, Microsoft is now testing a bug patch that should get rid of the issue.

Initially released on November 22, Microsoft mentions that the KB5007262 (OS Build 22000.348) preview has a fix related to write operations. The company also mentions that Windows 11 was performing unnecessary actions each time a write operation occurs. However, the issue only occurs when the NTFS USN journal is enabled. In most cases, this is always enabled on the C: drive, which is the primary system disk for most NVMe SSDs installed on a PC.

An SSD inside the Surface Pro 7+.
Image used with permission by copyright holder

If you want to get this update today to patch this issue, there’s little risk in doing so. This monthly preview update was tested and verified by Microsoft before it’s release. Just go to Settings > Update & Security > Windows Update. Then, in the Optional updates available area, you’ll find the link to download and install the KB5007262 update. Download and installation should not take longer than five minutes, and you’ll also get some bonus features with this update, like a newly redesigned set of emojis.

It’s been a bit of a rough road for Microsoft when it comes to these Windows 11 bugs — even though fixes are usually issued within a few weeks or days. There have been various issues since the operating system launched. The list covers problems with right-click menus in the File Explorer, issues with performance, and empty folders in subsystem areas.

For now, though, the fix for slow NVMe drives is still in preview. There’s no risk of installing it early, but if you want to wait, Microsoft usually issues bug patches once a month on a day that’s known as “Patch Tuesday.” The next “Patch Tuesday” is expected for December 14. However, Microsoft has warned that the upcoming holidays and “minimal operations” in the United States might impact that release, so it may be worth it to grab this November 22 preview update now.

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Arif Bacchus
Arif Bacchus is a native New Yorker and a fan of all things technology. Arif works as a freelance writer at Digital Trends…
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