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How to take a screenshot on Windows 11

Knowing how to take a screenshot on Windows 11 is really useful for sharing information, troubleshooting problems, or just grabbing a snapshot of something in your favorite game or TV show. But whatever you want to take a screenshot for, there are a few different ways to do it in Windows 11.

Difficulty

Easy

Duration

5 minutes

What You Need

Many of them will be familiar to anyone who knows how to take a screenshot in Windows 10, but there are some new ones too.

How to take a screenshot in Windows 11 with Print Screen

The quickest and easiest way to take a no-frills screenshot in Windows 11 is to use its built-in keyboard shortcut.

Step 1: Press Windows key > Print Screen. Note, if your Print Screen key has multiple functions (most common on laptops) then you may also need to press the FN key simultaneously.

Step 2: The screen should dim slightly to show you that a screenshot has been taken. It will automatically save as a fullscreen PNG image of whatever is on the screen at the time.

Step 3: Navigate to This PC > Pictures > Screenshots to locate your screenshot(s).

Taking a screenshot using the Windows 11 Snipping tool.
Image used with permission by copyright holder

How to take a screenshot in Windows 11 using the Snipping tool

The Snipping Tool is a Windows 10 carryover that features a versatile method for taking screenshots in Windows 11.

Step 1: Press Shift > Windows Key > S to launch the Snipping tool.

Step 2: The box that appears at the top of the window gives you a few different options:

  • Rectangle Snip: Select this, then use your mouse to draw a rectangular section of the screen you want to screenshot.
  • Freeform Snip: Select this, then use your mouse to draw any kind of shape to take a screenshot.
  • Window Snip: Select this, then select the particular window on screen that you want to take a screenshot of.
  • Fullscreen Snip: Select this to take a screenshot of your entire screen as it appears without the Snipping tool overlay.

Step 3: When you've taken your screenshot, a notification will appear in the bottom right letting you immediately select and edit the image, if you want. Alternatively, you can find the image in This PC > Pictures > Screenshots.

Windows 11 Xbox Game Bar overlay.
Image used with permission by copyright holder

How to take a screenshot in Windows 11 using the Xbox Game Bar

Even if you don't use the Xbox Game Bar for any of its gaming-focused features, it is still a useful tool for taking screenshots in Windows 11.

Step 1: Press the Windows key + G keys to bring up the Xbox Game Bar.

Step 2: Click the 8Screenshot (Camera) icon8 in the top-left within the Capture window. Alternatively, you can press Windows key > Alt > Print Screen.

Step 3: You'll be able to find the image in This PC > Videos > Captures.

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