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PlayStation 5 gets some colorful new faceplates

Sony announced that PlayStation 5 console covers will be available for purchase in more colors starting in June. The colors include Starlight Blue, Galactic Purple, and Nova Pink.

On June 17, Early Access customers in the U.S., U.K., France, Germany, Belgium, Netherlands, and Luxembourg will be able to buy them through the PlayStation Direct store for $55 each. There are covers for both the PlayStation 5 with the disc drive and the all-digital version.

Customers can also pre-order the covers, with free launch day delivery available. However, due to high demand, each customer will only be able to purchase one color per household.

The storefront also has matching colors for the PlayStation 5 DualSense controllers for $75 each.  The Starlight Blue, Galactic Purple, and Nova Pink colors will be available for purchase at other retailers on July 14.

A vivid range of PS5 Console Covers in Starlight Blue, Galactic Purple, and Nova Pink will be available in select regions starting June 2022: https://t.co/u4yqM3VA2x pic.twitter.com/CKcn2bS2Su

— PlayStation (@PlayStation) May 17, 2022

The previous two colors that were made available earlier this year in January were Cosmic Red and Midnight Black.

While these are PlayStation’s official face cover colors, other companies offered similar products before Sony went to market with its own. Dbrand is the most notable one. The company makes “PS5 Darkplates” which are very similar to Sony’s face covers, but actually offer more customization. The latest 2.0 design allows customers to pick several different colors for the outer plate, the middle skin, and even the light strips (which are blue and orange by default)

The Dbrand site cheekily lists its disc drive version PS5 Darkplates as “not illegal” and its digital edition ones as “also not illegal,” referencing its legal battle with Sony last year.

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