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PlayStation games we want to see added to PS Plus

It’s official: PlayStation Now is dead, and PlayStation Plus is expanding to include everything that service offered in a new tiered subscription model. Aside from the Essential tier, which is functionally identical to PS Plus currently, the Extra and Premium tiers promise to add different amounts of game options for downloading and streaming from the entire history of Sony consoles. The Extra tier only allows downloading of PS4 and PS5 games, but the Premium level has those hundreds of titles, plus a promised catalog of over 300 PS1, PS2, PSP, and PS3 games to stream and download. PS Now had a limited selection of PS2 titles and a decent library of PS3 games, but no PS1 or PSP games at all, which might be the deciding factor for those who want to subscribe to this tier.

The biggest ace Sony has up its sleeve against the competition has always been first-party games. While Sony has expressed many times that it doesn’t intend to offer its big first-party games on PS Plus at launch, the PlayStation back catalog is full of amazing titles we would love to be able to play all in one place. Drawing on that history could be another avenue that helps make this new service a success without directly matching its biggest competition, Game Pass.

Excluding games currently offered in the PS Plus Collection and PS Now, as well as the first-party titles Sony has already confirmed to be coming when the service launches (Death Stranding, God of War, Marvel’s Spider-Man, Marvel’s Spider-Man: Miles Morales, and Returnal), here are the PlayStation games we most want to see come to this new version of PS Plus.

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PS1 games

Crash Bandicoot

Crash Bandicoot
81 %
E
Platforms PlayStation, PlayStation 3, PlayStation Portable
Genre Platform, Adventure
Developer Naughty Dog
Publisher Sony Computer Entertainment, Inc. (SCEI), Sony Interactive Entertainment
Release August 31, 1996
Crash wasn’t where developer Naughty Dog truly first started, but it was its first series under PlayStation. This odd choice for a mascot platformer ended up becoming a smash hit for offering something new to the still-evolving 3D platformer genre. The fixed perspective of running toward the camera in some stages was certainly a risky choice, but the well-designed levels, bright and colorful cast, and satisfying controls helped the series, and the PS1 as a whole, stand up to the giant that was Mario. Plus, all the time trials and challenges made it last far longer than a single playthrough. We did get the collection of remakes for the PS4 (which is included in the PS Plus Collection), but having the originals to go back to, in all their sharp polygonal glory, would be a welcome walk down memory lane for those of us who grew up with the shorts-wearing marsupial.

Spyro the Dragon

Spyro the Dragon
79 %
E
Platforms PlayStation, PlayStation 3, PlayStation Portable
Genre Platform, Adventure
Developer Insomniac Games
Publisher Sony Computer Entertainment, Universal Interactive Studios
Release September 10, 1998
Just like Crash, Spryo was another successful attempt at creating a new 3D platformer but was designed in a very different way. Focusing more on large, explorable worlds rather than linear ones, Spyro was more like an interactive animated movie at the time, and even more so with the remaster the first three games also recently received. Again, though, the originals are well worth making available to revisit. The controls might be a tad clunky by today’s standards, but the charm is still burning bright with this little purple dragon.

Gran Turismo 2

Gran Turismo 2
81 %
E
Platforms PlayStation
Genre Racing, Simulator
Developer Polyphony Digital
Publisher Sony Computer Entertainment, Inc. (SCEI)
Release December 11, 1999
The Gran Turismo series is one of PlayStation’s longest-running series that continues to this day. Each game pushes the graphical fidelity of the console it’s released on to the absolute limits, and while looking back might not take anyone’s breath away as it might have in 1999, it is always a fun time to see what was once considered cutting-edge graphics. On top of that, Gran Turismo 2 is still a perfectly enjoyable simulation racing game. It’s limited in terms of modes and options compared to today’s games, but that makes it perfect for a quick look without having to dig out old hardware.

Twisted Metal 2

Twisted Metal 2
73 %
T
Platforms PC (Microsoft Windows), PlayStation, PlayStation 3
Genre Fighting, Shooter, Racing
Developer SingleTrac Entertainment Technologies
Publisher Sony Computer Entertainment, Inc. (SCEI)
Release October 31, 1996
On the absolute opposite end of the car genre, Twisted Metal 2 combined a dark, over-the-top premise with even more outrageous characters, vehicles, and weapons in a fantastically addicting arena combat game like nothing else before or after. The sequel was basically just the first game, only supercharged with more modes, abilities, new characters, and more. The series went downhill after this game, with a very lackluster game on the PS3 being the last time we’ve seen it. However, with plans for a TV series based on the property in the works, now’s the best time to bring back the pinnacle of the series to show people what it’s all about.

PS2 games

Sly Cooper and the Thievius Raccoonus

Sly Cooper and the Thievius Raccoonus
81 %
E
Platforms PlayStation 2, PlayStation 3, PlayStation Vita
Genre Platform, Puzzle, Adventure
Developer Sucker Punch Productions, Sanzaru Games
Publisher Sony Computer Entertainment, Inc. (SCEI)
Release September 23, 2002
The three Sly Cooper games are technically on PS Now already via an HD collection, however there’s one main problem with that: The collection is on the PS3 and only available to be streamed. The actual list of true, downloadable PS2 games on PS Now is criminally thin, and this trio of stylish stealth-action platformers is an omission that must be fixed. For a time, Sly and his gang of thieves were among the most popular games on PlayStation, which is saying something considering the stiff competition they were up against. The unique spin of being a thief, plotting out heists, and going through some really dark and interesting plots, mixed with the cell-shaded art style and animal cast, was a stroke of brilliance by Sucker Punch. While that team has moved on to bigger things, plenty of us still hope to see the Cooper gang back in action some day. But until then, give us the trilogy that started it all the way it was meant to be played.

Jak and Daxter: The Precursor Legacy

Jak and Daxter: The Precursor Legacy
80 %
E
Platforms PlayStation 2, PlayStation 3, PlayStation Vita, PlayStation 4
Genre Platform, Adventure
Developer Naughty Dog
Publisher Sony Computer Entertainment, Inc. (SCEI)
Release December 03, 2001
Our next, but not quite last, excuse to talk about Naughty Dog’s evolution is from Crash to the Jak and Daxter series. Even back then, the studio was proving that it had the chops to up its game in nearly every way for a new console generation. This trilogy, not counting the racing game, which we could take or leave, follows the same loophole as the Sly games. They are there on PS Now but only streaming the HD versions. For platformers that require as precise execution as some of the challenges these games throw at you, anything less than an immediate response won’t cut it. Plus, with Naughty Dog being Sony’s crown jewel of a studio at this point, how could we not have the studio’s entire legacy at our fingertips on this service? It’s a no-brainer.

Ratchet & Clank

Ratchet & Clank
82 %
T
Platforms PlayStation 2, PlayStation 3
Genre Shooter, Platform, Adventure
Developer Insomniac Games
Publisher Sony Computer Entertainment, Inc. (SCEI)
Release November 04, 2002
Standing right alongside Sly and Jak, the PS2 introduced the iconic duo that helped show off the power of the PS5, Ratchet and Clank. Back in the PS2 and PS3 days, these games were coming out at what felt like an annual pace and yet never dipped in quality. The series went dark for the PS4 until the eventual remake of the first game came out along with the film and of course was followed up by the PS5 exclusive. However, with Insomniac now juggling this series, Spider-Man, and a Wolverine game, it might be quite a while before we return to this colorful and imaginative franchise. While that is a shame, letting us revisit the classic PS2 games would at least give those new fans of the series a way to keep the fun rolling.

God of War

God of War
85 %
M
Platforms PlayStation 2
Genre Strategy, Hack and slash/Beat 'em up, Adventure
Developer SIE Santa Monica Studio
Publisher Sony Computer Entertainment, Inc. (SCEI), Capcom
Release March 22, 2005
The first two God of War games are some of the best action titles on the PS2, which is saying something when in the company of games like Devil May Cry. However, these games are all the more important now that the series has reemerged with the 2018 game also simply titled God of War, which isn’t a reboot, as some thought. Those original games are not only still canon but are arguably more important than ever to the story of Kratos. Yes, they’re edgy, self-indulgent, and over the top, but somehow the new games managed to incorporate all those aspects into building a new Kratos that we’ve all fallen in love with. We don’t know how it will all end up for our god-killing anti-hero, but at least let people know how it began with these amazing titles.

PSP games

Syphon Filter: Logan's Shadow

Syphon Filter: Logan's Shadow
Platforms PlayStation 2, PlayStation Portable
Genre Shooter
Developer SIE Bend Studio
Publisher Sony Computer Entertainment, Inc. (SCEI)
Release October 02, 2007
The PSP didn’t have a ton of first-party support, but one cult classic series from Sony Bend aimed to be another pillar in the stealth-action genre with the likes of Metal Gear and Splinter Cell. Syphon Filter had what it took, too, even on a handheld. This game had outstanding graphics for the little machine, a deep and twisting plot, and solid gameplay that would only benefit from full controller support. There are tons of fun gadgets to use, and, despite some brain-dead enemies, it’s a blast to run through the smaller missions. With the stealth genre being almost abandoned by the old guard, we need Syphon Filter back now more than ever.

Resistance: Retribution

Resistance: Retribution
60 %
M
Platforms PlayStation Portable
Genre Shooter
Developer SCE Bend Studio
Publisher Sony Computer Entertainment, Inc. (SCEI)
Release March 12, 2009
Resistance: Fall of Man was the PS3’s big attempt at an FPS and managed to improve with each game in the series. However, the oft-overlooked handheld entry in the series was perhaps even more important for showcasing how viable a FPS could be on the handheld. Also developed by Sony Bend, the game shares a lot of the same control scheme as the Syphon Filter games, and for the best. It keeps the cool guns, with alternate firing modes, but at the same time the AI is still rather lacking. On a handheld that might’ve been a blessing, it could be more noticeable with full controller support. A new objective system makes replaying the smaller levels rewarding, and there’s a ton to unlock and collect. If we get the rest of the series to show up, the new PS Plus should show some love to the smaller handheld entry as well.

Daxter

Daxter
80 %
E10
Platforms PlayStation Portable
Genre Platform, Adventure
Developer Ready at Dawn
Publisher Sony Computer Entertainment, Inc. (SCEI)
Release March 14, 2006
Finally, a game that some consider the system’s best game bar none — we have the solo adventure of the sidekick to Jak, Daxter. This game fills in what was basically a gag from the beginning of Jak 2, where it takes Daxter a whole two years to rescue Jak after he’s taken prisoner. This game takes a lot more inspiration from the first game in the series, being more platforming heavy than action and third-person shooter focused, which fits Daxter’s character and personality much better. It was one of the last great PS2-style platformers before Sony shifted focus to more serious titles.

PS3 games

Resistance: Fall of Man

Resistance: Fall of Man
69 %
M
Platforms PlayStation 3
Genre Shooter, Adventure
Developer Insomniac Games
Publisher Sony Computer Entertainment, Inc. (SCEI)
Release November 11, 2006
For whatever reason, only Resistance 3 is available currently on PS Now, which is a major shame. Not only does it not make sense to only have the last chapter in a franchise from a narrative perspective, but functionally, too. We don’t get to go through the evolution of the series, which helped launch the PS3 back in the day. Sure, Resistance 3 might be the best of them, but it just seems like such an obvious miss to leave out the first two for no apparent reason. The PS3 was criminally light on quality FPS games, especially from first party, so getting the entire series up there should be a top priority.

Pain

Pain
77 %
T
Platforms PlayStation 3
Genre Sport
Developer Idol Minds
Publisher Sony Computer Entertainment, Inc. (SCEI)
Release November 29, 2007
If we can only continue to stream PS3 games, then a game like Pain would work very well with the limitations that come with imperfect controls. This game is all about being a funny, explosive, and just purely fun experience of causing as much pain and destruction as possible. The cartoony art style would hold up just fine, and the controls don’t need to be super precise. It’s also a throwback to the more high-score-driven arcade experiences of the past that people won’t pay for alone anymore but would totally jump into for an afternoon if it’s not costing them anything. There’s a lot of crazy fun to be had here in these well-designed levels.

PS4 games

The Last of Us Part II

The Last of Us Part II
93 %
5/5
M
Platforms PlayStation 4
Genre Shooter, Adventure
Developer Naughty Dog
Publisher Sony Interactive Entertainment
Release June 19, 2020
OK, it’s not only been over two years since The Last of Us Part II came out, but we also have an entirely new system. Unless Sony plans on selling a fully native PS5 version — which it seriously could be doing — this is the biggest shot we could reasonably see Sony shoot to add a big name to this new service’s launch. The game has already sold tons of copies, the HBO show is in the works, and a stand-alone multiplayer game is eventually coming too — it just makes too much sense to not put this as one of the flagship titles for the new PS Plus. It shows off the PS4 at its best and builds hype for everything else coming in this universe.

Ghost of Tsushima

Ghost of Tsushima
90 %
4.5/5
M
Platforms PlayStation 4
Genre Adventure
Developer Sucker Punch Productions
Publisher Sony Interactive Entertainment
Release July 17, 2020
Similarly to The Last of Us and Twisted Metal, Ghost of Tsushima is also getting into other media with a film, though that is much further off. Still, this game might actually give The Last of Us Part II a run for its money in terms of being the system’s most gorgeous game, but for completely different reasons. No, the character models and facial details in cutscenes aren’t up to par, but the vistas, colors, and vibe of the game are unbelievable. This new IP broke records and is essentially a better version of what an Assassin’s Creed would be if it finally went to Japan. This would be another huge get for PS Plus and would certainly draw a lot of people to the higher tiers.
Read our full Ghost of Tsushima review

Dreams

Dreams
90 %
T
Platforms PlayStation 4
Genre Adventure
Developer Media Molecule
Publisher Sony Computer Entertainment, Inc. (SCEI)
Release February 14, 2020
Poor Dreams really, really needs this. Probably more than any other game listed, this game needs an active community to survive. So many thought, and hoped, that it would eventually be made free, but that doesn’t seem to be happening unless it was being held for this new service. Being a game-making and sharing tool, Dreams is on life support from a dedicated group that is making some fantastic projects, but a huge injection of new players could easily elevate this game to its full potential as a collaborative platform for artists of all kinds. Plus, even if people just wanted to play other people’s creations, this is a title that would be so easy to just jump into every now and then.

PS5 games

Demon's Souls

Demon's Souls
87 %
M
Platforms PlayStation 5
Genre Role-playing (RPG), Hack and slash/Beat 'em up
Developer Bluepoint Games
Publisher Sony Interactive Entertainment
Release November 12, 2020
There aren’t a ton of PS5 titles to pick from just yet, and Sony knows it dropped the ball by not publishing Demon’s Souls in the West back in the day. The remake by Bluepoint proves that beyond a shadow of a doubt, and with Elden Ring selling record numbers, more people than ever have that Souls itch. Even longtime fans of the series may have missed out on the originator of the genre, and this PS5 launch title has probably run its course in terms of sales now, so adding this alongside Bloodborne is a great combo to draw in that crowd.

DEATHLOOP

DEATHLOOP
84 %
3.5/5
M
Platforms PC (Microsoft Windows), PlayStation 5
Genre Shooter, Adventure
Developer Arkane Studios
Publisher Bethesda Softworks
Release September 14, 2021
The next two on this list are weird but might make the most sense. Deathloop was the first game Sony got its hands on before Microsoft snatched Bethesda up, and right now it’s on a timer before that exclusivity vanishes and it comes to Xbox and Game Pass. The game is incredibly well-received critically and has already seen tons of discounts. It just seems like the smart decision to use it for one last play to get people onto its subscription service before Xbox does the same.
Read our full DEATHLOOP review

GhostWire: Tokyo

GhostWire: Tokyo
3.5/5
RP
Platforms PC (Microsoft Windows), PlayStation 5
Genre Adventure
Developer Tango Gameworks
Publisher Bethesda Softworks
Release March 25, 2022
There’s not much new to say for this one, except that Ghostwire Tokyo hasn’t set the world on fire in the same way Deathloop did. We don’t know how it’s doing in terms of sales, but being a good game coming out next to titanic hits probably didn’t bode well for this experimental, yet still fun and unique, horror-themed adventure. Again, it’s only a matter of time before Xbox gets to flaunt this game for its service, so it could be in Sony’s best interest to bite the bullet, as it were, and bring this newer game on to bolster what will probably be a thin PS5 lineup at launch.
Read our full GhostWire: Tokyo review

Ratchet & Clank: Rift Apart

Ratchet & Clank: Rift Apart
90 %
4/5
E10
Platforms PlayStation 5
Genre Shooter, Platform, Adventure
Developer Insomniac Games
Publisher Sony Interactive Entertainment
Release June 11, 2021
Finally — and this one could really go either way — is Ratchet and Clank: Rift Apart. We have seen Sony offer the 2016 reboot on PS Plus, as a giveaway, and in the PS Plus collection, so it’s not completely opposed to using this series as an incentive. This game did come out fairly early in the console’s life, when sales numbers for the system itself were still on the lower side, and as time goes on and more are sold, this could easily be a game that falls off people’s radar in favor of more recent titles. If Ratchet and Clank: Rift Apart were a free perk for the new PS Plus tiers, it would be such a major selling point since the game was pushed as the PS5’s premier showcase for the power of the solid-state drive. On top of that, it’s a crazy-fun game that appeals to gamers of all ages.

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