Skip to main content

Digital Trends may earn a commission when you buy through links on our site. Why trust us?

Intel said AMD’s Ryzen 7000 is snake oil

An Intel marketing slide comparing AMD processors to snake oil.
Intel

In what is one of the most bizarrely aggressive pieces of marketing material I’ve seen, Intel compared AMD’s Ryzen 7000 mobile chips to snake oil. Over the weekend, Intel posted its Core Truths playbook, which lays out how AMD’s mobile processor naming scheme misleads customers. The presentation has since been deleted, according to The Verge.

There’s an element of truth to that, which I’ll get to in a moment, but first, the playbook, which was first spotted by VideoCardz. Intel starts with claiming that there’s a “long history of selling half-truths to unsuspecting customers” alongside images of a snake oil salesman and a suspicious used car seller. This sets up a comparison between the Ryzen 5 7520U and the Core i5-1335U. Intel’s chip is 83% faster, according to the presentation, due to the older architecture that AMD’s part uses.

AMD's 2023 naming scheme for mobile processors.
AMD

Intel has a point here. Last year, AMD changed its mobile naming convention, which obfuscated underpowered parts using an older architecture. Instead of matching architecture with generation, as Intel and AMD have done for years, AMD now says all of its mobile processors are part of the latest Ryzen 7000 generation regardless of the architecture they use.

Now, the third number in the name shows the architecture the CPU uses. For example, the Ryzen 5 7640U uses the Zen 4 architecture, while the Ryzen 5 7520U uses the Zen 2 architecture. It’s clear how this can be misleading when a chip using an older architecture is shown alongside the latest generation of CPUs.

It’s a little ironic coming from Intel, though. This was a few years ago, but it’s hard to forget that Intel sat behind its 14nm node introduced with Skylake on desktop for years, making incremental performance improvements with each generation that followed.

Some of that still applies today. Intel just released its 14th-gen processors for desktop, which are basically rebranded versions of its 13th-gen Raptor Lake processors. There are some performance improvements, but they aren’t very large. Similarly, we’re about to get 14th-gen Meteor Lake processors for laptops, but we aren’t seeing those chips on desktop, creating a mismatch for what “14th-gen” means for Intel across its product stack.

An Acer Aspire 3 laptop listing at Best Buy.
Digital Trends

Still, Intel’s shuffling with naming shouldn’t distract from AMD’s fault here. The Ryzen 7000 naming scheme is confusing on mobile, and it can mislead buyers into buying a processor that’s older than what the name implies. There are laptops using these chips, too. For instance, the Ryzen 7 7520U is featured in the Acer Aspire 3, which is an affordable laptop .

Thankfully, AMD’s chips aren’t available in a ton of laptops, at least not compared to Intel. Otherwise, the naming scheme would be a much bigger issue.

Intel’s playbook holds some truth, even if it is a little aggressive. Regardless, it’s proof that it’s always important to read up on a product you’re interested in buying, no matter if it comes from AMD or Intel.

Editors' Recommendations

Jacob Roach
Senior Staff Writer, Computing
Jacob Roach is a writer covering computing and gaming at Digital Trends. After realizing Crysis wouldn't run on a laptop, he…
Using an RTX 3060? Here’s the GPU to upgrade to next
EVGA RTX 3060 sitting on a table.

Nvidia's RTX 3060 is a certified legend. It's the most popular graphics card in gaming PCs, according to the Steam hardware survey, and that makes sense. For gamers playing at 1080p, you can't ask for more than what the RTX 3060 offers between its low price, 12GB of VRAM, and features like Nvidia's Deep Learning Super Sampling (DLSS).

But where do you go from there? If you picked up an RTX 3060 over the last couple of years and you're looking to take your PC gaming to the next level, I rounded up the best GPUs to upgrade to from the RTX 3060.

Read more
AMD’s FSR 3 compromise just isn’t working
AMD presenting FSR 3 at Gamescom.

AMD made a compromise with FSR 3. The frame-generation tech was announced in November 2022, and it took nearly a year for it to show up in a game. Even now, months after release, FSR 3 is only available in 12 games, the lion's share of which are legacy titles and single-player games that are past their prime. Adoption wasn't working, hence the need for a compromise.

The compromise is AMD Fluid Motion Frames, or AFMF -- one of the least catchy acronyms, but I digress. This is driver-based frame generation. FSR 3 isn't available in a ton of games, but AFMF sidesteps that hurdle, so long as you have an AMD graphics card. You can use frame generation through the driver in basically any DirectX 11 or DirectX 12 game. Sounds pretty sweet.

Read more
Helldivers 2 PC performance: best settings, performance, crashing
A scene from Helldiver 2's opening cutscene.

Helldivers 2 marks the first time PlayStation Studios has launched a game on PC and consoles at the same time, and it's not off to the best start. Helldivers 2 is very impressive from a visual and performance perspective, but crashing and matchmaking issues are currently souring the experience for some players.

I've been playing the game a bit, and I'm here to run down the best settings for Helldivers 2 on PC that I've found. We'll also talk a bit about performance overall, as well as the interesting upscaling options built into the game.
Best settings for Helldivers 2

Read more