Panasonic and NHK unveil 34-million pixel, IMAX-worthy 145-inch TV

nhk and panasonic 145 inch tv

When it comes to TVs, bigger is better. NHK, also known as the Japanese Broadcasting Corporation, unveiled its 85-inch LCD display, developed in conjunction with Sharp, last year. Today they’ve bested their previous technology with the introduction of a 145-inch Ultra High Definition plasma display, developed in conjunction with Panasonic. The ultra-high-definition display, or Super Hi-Vision TV as NHK refers to the format, rivals IMAX theaters in detail.

“Even when viewed from 1.6 meters away, this Ultra High Definition display makes you feel as if you’re looking at a real screen,” Panasonic CTO, Hideo Toyoda, told DigiInfoTV. “It doesn’t use 3D technology, but the picture is so realistic, you feel truly immersed in the scene.”

The television is innovative in two parts. First, the television is among the few of its kind that does not a require backlight like most televisions do today. Second, to avoid emitting flickering images on its 4,320 x 7,680 pixel screen, it employs a novel drive system that stabilizes its 34 million pixels.

The television delivers theater-quality images at 60 frames per second and an aspect ratio of 16:9. The pixel pitch, the distance between each pixel on the screen, is 0.417 mm horizontally and 0.417 mm vertically and the television uses a RBG vertical stripe phosphor array.

The bad news for those of us hoping to land one for next Christmas: Unfortunately, the current 145-inch UHD display is merely a prototype to showcase the possibilities of these massive screens. It’s going to be a while before you can claim even its 85-inch counterpart for yourself. Roger Mosey, the BBC’s Director of the 2012 London Olympic Games coverage, who is responsible for testing three Super-High Vision 50-feet high screens, revealed that the Sharp 85-inch screens will not be made available until at least 2022.

As for the 145-inch screen, Toyoda divulged that the technology will be more suited for theaters than in homes, although the end goal is to get the television into the hands of consumers.

The 145-inch display will be demoed next month at the Institute of Technology from May 24 to May 27, and will make its demo round in the United States at the SID International Symposium from June 3 to June 8.

If you can’t wait and would be willing to throw down money for the price of a luxury car, you can always settle for Bang & Olufsen’s 85-inch 3DTV at a cost of $85,000.

Check out the video of the television below.

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