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The best open world games for PS5

Even though the PS5 is less than a year old, there are still a ton of great games available for it, spanning numerous genres. The PS5 has everything from shooters, to sports games, RPGs, and platformers, along with a wide variety of open world adventures. While “open world” isn’t necessarily a genre in and of itself, it’s a style that millions of players have fallen in love with over the years. These days, open world games are quite common, meaning the competition to grab your attention is much stiffer.

Despite this, there are so many fantastic open world games available on the PS5. Some lean into horror, others send you to historical periods, while one, in particular, lets you explore the entire galaxy. There is no shortage of open world games to play on PS5 and here, we’ll go through all of the best ones to choose from.

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Marvel’s Spider-Man: Miles Morales

Miles Morales in Spider-Man outfit fending off crime.

Following in the footsteps of one of the greatest (if not the greatest) superhero games of all time was likely no easy task. But Marvel’s Spider-Man: Miles Morales delivered, and in many ways is even better than the original Marvel’s Spider-Man. Whichever you prefer, there’s no denying just how fantastic this standalone game is. Everything from the story, writing, performances, and the way it portrays people of color is top-notch, raising the bar for how all of those things should be handled in the future.

But the glue that holds this game together is its gameplay, which is just as fast-paced and fun as the original. Swinging around New York City never felt better, and thanks to Miles’ different powers, playing this game is a unique, yet familiar experience. Marvel’s Spider-Man: Miles Morales is also a shorter game, clocking in at around 8 hours to complete, making it a digestible, yet full experience that never feels too long or short.

Demon’s Souls

The protagonist of Demon's Souls going up against a massive creature.

Although 2009’s Demon’s Souls is excellent and influential, it doesn’t hold up as well over a decade later. But that’s precisely why Bluepoint Games’ 2020 remake is so important, as it somehow preserves the integrity (and soul) of the original, while improving upon nearly every aspect of it, from visuals to gameplay. What’s fascinating is that the remake is nearly a one-to-one recreation of the original, which is particularly exciting if you know your way around the 2009 game.

When it comes to its design, it’s certainly more linear than a lot of the games on this list, but its labyrinthian structure makes it feel open-ended. It’s debatable whether it truly falls into the open world category, but an argument can certainly be made since each of the stages are so massive. Either way, this is one of the best games on the platform.

Of course, Demon’s Souls is notorious for its unrelenting difficulty, though the remake does address some of the frustrations, making it easier to play. It still feels very much like Demon’s Souls, but without many of the limitations from the PS3 edition. It’s not for everyone, but to the fans of the Souls games (or action RPGs in general), this PS5 launch title is a must-play.

No Man’s Sky

No Man's Sky beach location.
Hello Games

Calling No Man’s Sky an “open world” game is a bit of an understatement. That’s because this game is open universe. It consists of 18 quintillion planets, all of which are fully explorable. While some planets might have some similarities, no two are alike. No Man’s Sky is fascinating because it started as one of the most disappointing games of the previous generation. But since its launch in 2016, developer Hello Games has made good on its promises and then some.

In fact, looking at the vanilla version of No Man’s Sky compared to the current edition is a sight to behold. Nearly everything has been revamped, from the visuals to its multiplayer component, base-building, and exploration. Best of all is that every update is free, along with the PS5 upgrade, so long as you already owned the game on PS4. From a design standpoint, it’s impressive this game even exists.

Read our No Man’s Sky review 

Assassin’s Creed Valhalla

Assassin's Creed Valhalla Kill

Set during 872 AD, Assassin’s Creed Valhalla builds upon the fantastic foundation introduced in Odyssey, but instead focuses on Vikings and Norse mythology. With an incredibly beautiful and vibrant world, excellent combat, and a story that feels epic, Valhalla has a lot to love. Most impressively, the game completely doubles down on its RPG mechanics, giving you plenty of agency with how you build your character.

This makes each playthrough feel varied and unique, throwing linearity out the door. While this might be a turnoff to longtime Assassin’s Creed fans, RPG lovers will likely fall in love with this installment. Valhalla sure has its flaws, but developer Ubisoft has made substantial improvements to it since its launch, so right now is a great time to dive in.

Read our Assassin’s Creed Valhalla review

Ghost of Tsushima Director’s Cut

Jin plays his flute as Iki Island looms in the background.

Sony’s first-party studios set the bar high with open world games, from the likes of Marvel’s Spider-Man, Horizon Zero Dawn, and even God of War to a lesser extent. But it somehow managed to surpass the expectations of open world design in Ghost of Tsushima. One of the things we love about this game is how it doesn’t feel too big. There’s plenty to do, with lots of collectibles and places to explore, but you can get through the mainline story in a reasonable amount of time, which is refreshing.

The combat is deep and satisfying, the characters are likable, and it’s downright one of the most stunning games ever made. The Director’s Cut on PS5 is even more beautiful, and features additional content and quality of life improvements. Ghost of Tsushima isn’t just one of the great open world games, it’s one of the best PlayStation games. Period.

Read our Ghost of Tsushima review

Borderlands 3

The wacky cooperative shooter series is back with the third installment (not counting the Pre-Sequel), aptly titled Borderlands 3. This entry turns everything up to 11, with a greater emphasis on wild weapons, explosions, and over-the-top characters. Of course, Borderlands has always been a mashup of RPG and first-person shooter action, and this entry is no different.

You start off exploring a large open world, but eventually end up on other planets, though don’t expect to be able to travel across the entire galaxy like in No Man’s Sky. The ability to travel to different planets is one of this game’s strengths, as each one feels and looks unique, breaking up some of the monotony of making your way across the same area over and over again. Best of all is that Borderlands 3 prioritizes cooperative play, meaning you don’t have to travel alone.

The Elder Scrolls Online

Soldiers about to fight with a giant in the background.

Combining the classic Elder Scrolls gameplay with MMO mechanics is an absolute match made in heaven. The only thing more satisfying than completing quests and exploring the continent of Tamriel is doing it with friends, and that’s exactly what you get in The Elder Scrolls Online. It has all the features you know and love from games like Skyrim, with the ability to create and customize your own character, their attributes, and abilities.

The kicker is being able to experience what this game has to offer with others, with the option to tackle quests with your friends. Though, you’re able to play this game by yourself, as long as you’re connected to the internet. Thankfully, The Elder Scrolls Online ditched its monthly subscription model in favor of a buy-to-play offering instead, making it easier to justify giving it a try. On PS5, the game supports 4K at 30 frames per second.

Read our The Elder Scrolls Online review

Resident Evil Village

A zombie attacking in Resident Evil Village.

Once again, Resident Evil Village is a game that falls just on the line of being open world, featuring large areas to explore that don’t feel massive. The village itself is large and has tons of items hidden throughout every nook and cranny, making it feel very much like an open world. Like its predecessor, Resident Evil 7, Village is presented from a first-person view, upping the ante in the horror and immersion departments, along with a ton of creepy monsters to take out (or run away from).

Littered throughout the world and castle is currency you can use to upgrade your weapons, which incentives you to explore. Some players might not be as into the more action-oriented approach in Village, but even if survival horror is your preference, we still recommend giving this one a try. It also has some wild boss fights, along with a slew of fantastic, memorable characters. Resident Evil Village is, in many ways, a modern take on Resident Evil 4, encouraging exploration and action, while still being scary.

Read our Resident Evil Village review

Immortals Fenyx Rising

Immortals Fenyx Rising vaults

One game that arguably doesn’t get the credit it deserves is Immortals Fenyx Rising (formally known as Gods and Monsters). This was a launch title for PS5 and focuses on Greek mythology, from the perspective of Zeus, Prometheus, and Fenyx. In it, you play as Fenyx, and can customize them to a certain degree. Since this is an open world Ubisoft game, you might already know what to expect from it.

There are lots of icons across the map, with various objectives to complete. As you check each one off your list, your character grows stronger, much like Assassin’s Creed and Far Cry. Fenyx Rising, however, is far less realistic, with a vibrant art style, and featuring various abilities that make you feel like a god. This game is also wonderfully written, leaning into humor and wit, rather than a serious tone. Overall, it borrows from many games you might already like, such as Breath of the Wild and Ubisoft’s most popular open world games, but it does enough to stand on its own.

Read our Immortals Fenyx Rising review

Yakuza: Like a Dragon

Yakuza: Like a Dragon is remarkable in the way it feels very much like a video game, while still immersing you into its world. That’s a fine line to walk, because it’s easy to stray too far in one direction or the other. Interestingly, Like a Dragon is a major departure for the series, featuring a turn-based battle system that takes the place of its beat ’em up formula from before. This is arguably a much-needed change that makes it feel like a true JRPG.

Beyond the superb gameplay is one of the best cast of characters a video game has ever had. These characters are all wonderfully realized, with backstories you can’t help but get invested into. This also makes the story so much more engaging, with cliffhangers, and twists and turns all over the place. The very end of the game is such an emotional moment that will no doubt lead to tears.

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