This smart lock adds a Touch ID-style fingerprint sensor to your door

lockly smart lock fingerprint scanner algorithm access code secure  s3

Smart locks are basically everywhere at this point, and there are all sorts of ways to lock down your house. But Lockly’s latest offering brings something both familiar and unique to your front door that will keep you secure. The company’s Secure Plus lock uses a 3D fingerprint scanner and algorithm-generated passcode that should make your home uncrackable.

Lockly’s newest security system basically puts Touch ID on your front door. It can scan and store up to 99 fingerprints that it knows to trust and allow into the home when it recognizes them. The 3D sensor supposedly can’t be tricked with a replicated fingerprint or photograph and will only unlock when it identifies a physical match.

Beyond the fingerprint scanner is the company’s randomly generated access code system that features prominently on the front of the device. There are four circles populated by three numbers. Each time you use the door, the digits change positions on the keypad. While your access code remains the same, it would be next to impossible for someone to guess it by watching you enter the code.

Perhaps most impressive about Lockly’s proprietary algorithm system is the fact it doesn’t require any sort of internet connection to work. The numbers move around in an effectively random pattern so your door remains safe from any would-be intruders waiting to get in. This also mitigates any concerns about hackers manipulating the lock via an internet connection — though the door does support Wi-Fi and Bluetooth internet connections.

Once you’re in the house, whether you entered by fingerprint scanner or access code, Lockly can also make sure that you’re locked in. You can set up a custom time frame for the security device to automatically lock the door, just in case you or your family members forget to.

Of course, on the off-chance things go haywire with Lockly’s high-tech security features or the battery dies (it uses AA batteries that last for a full year), there is still the option to use a physical key to unlock the door.

Lockly’s Secure Plus lock will retail for $250 for the deadbolt version and $270 for a latch version. The company is also selling its Secure lock, which features the access code system but not the fingerprint sensor. That goes for $200 for the deadbolt and $230 for the latch.

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