GE adapts jet engine tech to silently cool electronics without fans

ge dcj cooling

Covered in detail in a release on General Electric’s site, a GE development team has come up with a way to get rid of pesky heat within electronics without making a sound. Utilizing technology modified from the bellows that cool down high-velocity jets, GE’s Dual Piezoelectric Cooling Jets (DCJ) use half the power of a traditional fan, are completely silent during operation and just as efficient as a typical fan. If this technology is incorporated within laptops, consumers will ultimately have more battery life due to the reduced power needs of the DCJ. 

dcj cooling technologyIn addition, the DCJ is about the size of a credit card, just four millimeters thick. It’s possible that this new technology could result in even thinner ultrabooks over time.

Due to the simple design of the DCJ, the technology will also result in much higher reliability than traditional fans and will help consumer electronics manufacturers save money on future repairs that are required due to extensive heat damage. When cooling a device, the DCJ can move one cubic foot of air per minute. 

In regards to the adaptation of the jet engine technology, General Electric VP Chris Giovanniello stated “With new tablet and netbook roadmaps moving to platforms measuring less than 6mm high, it is clear that consumers are demanding thinner and more powerful electronic devices. GE’s patented DCJ technology not only frees up precious space for system designers, but it consumes significantly less power, allowing as much as 30 minutes of extra battery life. Best of all, DCJ can be made so quiet that users won’t even know it’s running.”

At this time, General Electric is providing DCJ demo kits to consumer electronics manufacturers that are interested in licensing the technology for future products. Representatives expect the new cooling technology will be rolled out into a new generation of laptops, tablets and other consumer electronics products by late 2013 or early 2014. 

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