Glove One literally puts cellphone power in your hands and between fingers

glove-one

The universal hand signal for talking on the phone is generally the index finger pointing toward the ear and the pinky toward the mouth, with the middle and ring fingers folded. Though we know most cellphones (and even home phones) don’t abide by this design anymore, one artist has adapted a glove-like phone that requires the user to hold that motion to use it.

Using recycled electronic parts and custom-made circuits, Milwaukee-based artist Brian Cera developed the Glove One design as a wearable mobile communication device. In Cera’s mind, using a cellphone sacrifices the hand to hold it — so why not wear the phone so you can keep both hands usable? Maybe he’s never heard of Bluetooth ear pieces.

Glove-OneJokes aside, this “phantom limb” concept looks pretty wild. The prototype contains a futuristic armor that has all the digits along the fingers, and the SIM card gets inserted into a compartment at the middle of the hand. The fingers contain several nuts and bolts to give the wearer plenty of freedom and flexibility to move his or her hand around with Glove One on, and the entire model was made out of 3D printing technology using Superfine Plastic. Yes, it also works, though with the speakers and microphone installed at index and pinky fingers, holding the hand signal stance during long conversations will get real tiring. It sure won’t be useful for calling customer service lines with those terrible long waits.

Still, if you are interested in experimenting with 3D printing, coding, programming, and all things DIY, stick around for Cera’s upcoming tutorial where he aims to show readers at home how they can build their own Glove One cellphones. The design will probably pretty complicated if you’re looking to get the precise measurements of your fingers so the glove fits snugly. While you might not be able to use any apps on it and it won’t easily store in your pockets, try pointing that thing at the next person who tries to give you problems and they won’t wanna mess with your crazy looking fist.

Watch the demonstration video below to see how Glove One functions in real life.

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