National Geographic is not impressed with your hipster photo filters

national geographic is not impressed with your hipster photo filters no instagram

Instagram, Viddy, Hipstamatic… there are so many vintage photo and video filter apps these days, it almost feels unacceptable to publish a picture unless it’s undergone the retro filter treatment. But not according to National Geographic magazine. The publication seems to have received so many edited photos that the director of photography has published a new guideline that asks photographers to “please stop” with the alterations.

national geographic is not impressed with your hipster photo filters nat geo guideOf course, this all seems quite appropriate. National Geographic prides itself in exceptional photographic work that need little to no editing in order to show the world as authentically as possible. We’re not sure what prompted the director of photography to release the new guidelines for their “Your Shot” segment, but perhaps photo submitters are getting too comfortable with the help of Photoshop and whatever popular filters these days that something needed to be done.

“If you use one of the myriad alteration “filters” available in your digital photo software, please stop,” the guideline pleads. “If you have digitally added or removed anything, please don’t submit the shot. We look at every photo to see if it’s authentic, and if we find that yours is in any way deceptive, we’ll disqualify it.”

Does Instagram actually count as “deception”? I have to admit, even at Internet Week New York a few weeks ago, a photographer told me he prefers using vintage filters because “it makes people look better.” (Yes, I judged him a little.)

Other points of the guideline ask that photographers refrain from using fisheye lens and minimize the use of burn and dodge tools to darken highlights and brighten shadows (respectively) before the photo looks ‘overdone.’ Don’t get the magazine wrong — National Geographic has nothing against Instagram. In fact, it has its own account with photos of travel wonders that have clearly been edited with filters. It just doesn’t want Your Shot submissions to start looking like an Instacanvas gallery.

We have to agree with the director. A lot of times we use Flickr and other Creative Commons resources to find art for our posts, and we come across too many Instagram-type photos that simply do not work. Please keep those retro-filtered photos on your social media accounts and separate from what you’d call professional work. If the National Geographic won’t allow for it any time soon, that’s saying quite a bit. Now if only we can get magazines to minimize the use of Photoshop to begin with, especially when it comes to portraits…

Image Credit: Cult of Mac

Emerging Tech

Awesome Tech You Can’t Buy Yet: DIY smartphones and zip-on bike tires

Check out our roundup of the best new crowdfunding projects and product announcements that hit the web this week. You may not be able to buy this stuff yet, but it sure is fun to gawk!
Mobile

Huawei and Leica’s monochrome lens is dead, so we celebrate its life

The Huawei Mate 20 and Mate 20 Pro do not have a dedicated monochrome camera lens, unlike the P20 Pro, and various Huawei and Leica phones before it. It's the end of an era, and also the start of a new one, as Leica has worked on its…
Photography

Remove photo bombs, other unwanted objects with Photoshop’s new Content-Aware Fill

Photoshop's newest A.I-powered tool helps remove objects or fill in gaps for a distraction-free photo in the new Adobe Photoshop CC 2019. Here's how to remove an object in Photoshop using the new Content-Aware Fill.
Photography

You can finally throw away your PC; Photoshop is coming to the iPad

A full version of Photoshop is coming to the iPad -- and soon, other tablets, as well. Adobe also launched several new features for Photoshop and Lightroom, including a new Content-Aware Fill tool.
Photography

Photography News: Raw edits on iPad and an A.I. research lab for PicsArt

In this week's photography news, Canon launched an iPad app that allows for RAW edits on the go. Popular mobile editing app PicsArt now has a research lab dedicated entirely to A.I.-powered tools.
Emerging Tech

Here’s all the best gear and gadgetry you can snag for $100 or less

A $100 bill can get you further than you might think -- so long as you know where to look. Check out our picks for the best tech under $100, whether you're in the market for headphones or a virtual-reality headset.
Product Review

The design still says retro, but Fujifilm's X-T3 is all about the future

If the X-T2 brought Fujifilm into the modern era, the X-T3 is focused on the future. With a new sensor and processor, completely revamped autofocus, and vastly upgraded video, it's the new APS-C camera to beat.
News

Kodak’s ‘Digitizing Box’ service saves precious memories stuck on old media

If you've been meaning to convert your old family photos, videotapes, films, and audio recordings to digital but never seem to get around to it, then a new service from Kodak may prompt you to add it to your "to-do" list again.
Photography

Adobe’s Premiere Rush is a video-editing app designed for social media projects

At Adobe MAX 2018, Adobe unveiled updates across the board for all of its Creative Cloud apps, from the release of Premiere Rush CC, a social-focused video editor, to Project Gemini, a digital drawing and painting tool.
Photography

Sony crammed 28x zoom, 4K into a $450 camera that weighs as much as a smartphone

The Sony HX99 is a tiny compact camera that mixes 4K and fast burst speeds with a 28x optical zoom. The travel zoom camera upgrades the processor over the earlier model for better video and super-long-burst captures.
Photography

When you're ready to shoot seriously, these are the best DSLRs you can buy

For many photographers the DSLR is the go-to camera. With large selection of lenses, great low-light performance, and battery endurance, these DSLRs deliver terrific image quality for stills and videos.
Photography

Adobe Premiere Rush CC is the cloud-based video editing app you've been waiting for

On stage at Adobe MAX 2018, Adobe announced its cloud-centric, social video-editing application, Adobe Premiere Rush CC. We took some time to put it through its paces to see what it offers, how it works, and what's missing.
Photography

Adobe MAX 2018: What it is, why it matters, and what to expect

Each year, Adobe uses its Adobe MAX conference to show off its latest apps, technologies, and tools to help simplify and improve the workflow of creatives the world over. Here's what you should expect from this year's conference.
Computing

Adobe’s craziest new tools animate photos, convert recordings to music in a click

Adobe shared a glimpse behind the scenes at what's next and the Creative Cloud future is filled with crazy A.I.-powered tools, moving stills, and animation reacting to real-time tweets.