LimeWire reanimated by music pirates

limewire-screenshot

Well that didn’t take long. LimeWire, a peer-to-peer file sharing network  that was shut down due to music pirating, has been pirated. A group of hackers have rebuilt the program and re-released it.

According to TorrentFreak, a “secret dev team” has “reanimated the lifeless corpse of LimeWire and like an irrepressible file-sharing zombie, the world’s favorite Gnutella client is back.” Gnutella is the network that powered LimeWire. Even with LimeWire gone, several other file-sharing programs have been able to access this delicious spread of a network.

Pirate Edition improvements

After only two weeks off the web, The LimeWire Pirate Edition (LPE) is now available. The hackers even took the time to improve the product. “All dependencies on LimeWire LLC’s servers have been removed, all remote settings have been disabled, the Ask toolbar has been unbundled, and all features of LimeWire PRO have been activated for free,” a TorrentFreak source explained. “LimeWire Pirate Edition should work better than the last functioning version of LimeWire (5.5.10), and it should keep working for longer. There’s no adware or spyware: the piratical monkeys are doing this for the benefit of the community.”

The RIAA can’t be happy about this development. After years of court battles, on Oct. 26, a court order forced LimeWire to shut down. Now, just a couple weeks later, music pirates have brought it back.

Lime Wire drinks its own medicine

In a bit of irony, last night Lime Wire demanded that the LimeWire Pirate Edition be shut down. “We have very recently become aware of applications on the Internet purporting to use the LimeWire name, such as the LimeWire Pirate Edition,” said the company. “We demand that all persons using the LimeWire software, name, or trademark in order to upload or download copyrighted works in any manner cease and desist from doing so. We further remind you that the unauthorized uploading and downloading of copyrighted works is illegal.”

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