Over a quarter of a million people will lose Internet access on Monday

no-internet

While the total number of computers infected with the DNSChanger malware has dropped by about 20 percent since April 2012, the FBI released updated estimates this week regarding the amount of computers in the world that will lose an Internet connection on 12:01 a.m. EDT Monday, July 9. According to an Associated Press report, over 277,000 computers around the world are still infected and approximately 64,000 of those users are located in the United States. In Canada, the number of infected computers has dropped from 25,000 down to 7,000 due to the combined efforts of the Public Safety Canada and the Canadian Radio-television Telecommunications Commission. 

DNS Changer Check RedThe DNS Changer Working Group has setup a special site that allows people around the world to check and see if the malware is on their personal or work computer. To check your computer, click on the “Detect” link on the site and follow the instructions on the page.

If infected, the DCWG site includes instructions on removing the malware which including backing up all data and attempting to remove the malware with tools like Kaspersky Labs TDSSKiller, Hitman Pro, Norton Power Eraser or McAfee Stinger. The page also includes guides on how to use the software successfully as well as frequently asked questions from others that have undergone the same process.

According to security consultant Barry Greene, both Facebook and Google have been working together to see if users have been infected by the DNSChanger malware and offer instructions on how to fix the problem. Internet service providers are also attempting to notify users prior to the July 9 deadline. For instance, Comcast has sent letters and emails to customers with computers infected with the malware. Anyone still infected with the malware on Monday morning will likely have to call up their Internet service provider in order to regain access to the Web. Internet service providers may also direct customers to free malware removal tools on the Web that could help for future issues.

No Internet Scream

According to FBI supervisory special agent Tom Grasso, approximately fifty Fortune 500 companies still have computers infected with the DNSChanger malware. The majority of those infected users should be experiencing decreased browsing speed and it’s possible that their antivirus software has been disabled.

This can be a particularly difficult problem for large companies as infected computers are likely more susceptible to other forms as malware in addition to more serious computer viruses. Some extremely harmful forms of malware are so destructive that the average computer user has to install a fresh copy of their operating system to regain system control.

The July 9 cutoff date was set by the FBI eight months ago after the federal organization setup replacement servers as a safety net. This gave all users infected with the DNSChanger malware a sizable amount of time to discover and remove the harmful software from their computer. Basically, the malware has been redirecting users through the replacement servers. Before the criminals infecting people with the malware were caught by the FBI, they had been redirecting users to pages filled with online advertising and racked up approximately $14 million with their click-fraud scam.

Mobile

Google insists it’s doing what it can to purge Play Store of malicious apps

Google's efforts to provide a secure and safe Play Store for Android users resulted in the company rejecting 55 percent more app submissions in 2018 compared to a year earlier. But the challenge is ongoing.
Gaming

Here’s how to set up a virtual private network (VPN) on your Xbox One

Online privacy is more important now than it's ever been, and gaming is happening online more than ever before. Here's a quick guide on how to set up a VPN for your Xbox One so you game in safe anonymity.
Computing

Windows updates shouldn't cause problems, but if they do, here's how to fix them

Windows update not working? It's a more common problem than you might think. Fortunately, there are a few steps you can take to troubleshoot it and in this guide we'll break them down for you step by step.
Computing

These are the 6 best free antivirus apps to help protect your MacBook

Malware protection is more important than ever, even if you eschew Windows in favor of Apple's desktop platform. Thankfully, protecting your machine is as easy as choosing from the best free antivirus apps for Mac suites.
Computing

Microsoft’s Presidents Day Sale cuts price of some Surface laptops by up to $200

It is a great time to save on Windows 10 laptops. Microsoft's retail store is running a sale on some of the best tablets and laptops, cutting pricing by up to $200 on the Surface Laptop 2 and more.
Computing

New Chrome feature aimed at preventing websites from blocking Incognito Mode

A new Chrome feature will prevent websites from blocking Chrome users as they browse using Incognito Mode. The feature is supposed to fix a known loophole that allows websites to detect and block those using Incognito Mode.
Mobile

Need speed? Qualcomm unveils the Snapdragon X55, the world’s fastest 5G modem

Qualcomm is preparing for an even faster future: The silicon giant just unveiled a second generation 5G modem for smartphones, promising blistering download speeds as high as 7Gbps.
Photography

What’s the difference between Lightroom CC and Lightroom Classic?

Lightroom CC has evolved into a capable photo editor, but is it enough to supplant Lightroom Classic? We took each program for a test drive to compare the two versions and see which is faster, more powerful, and better organized.
Computing

Reluctant to give your email address away? Here's how to make a disposable one

Want to sign up for a service without the risk of flooding your inbox with copious amounts of spam and unwanted email? You might want to consider using disposable email addresses via one of these handy services.
Computing

Chrome is a fantastic browser, but is is still the best among new competitors?

Choosing a web browser for surfing the web can be tough with all the great options available. Here we pit the latest versions of Chrome, Opera, Firefox, Edge, and Vivaldi against one another to find the best browsers for most users.
Computing

Don't use streaming apps? Try the best free media players for your local music

Rather than using music-streaming apps, you may want something for playing your local music. Good news! There are some good alternatives. These are the best media players you can download for free on Windows.
Mobile

Barbie’s Corvette ain’t got nothing on Sphero’s fully programmable robot car

Sphero is known for devices like the Sphero Bolt and BB-8 Star Wars toy, but now the company is back with another addition to its lineup -- the Sphero RVR. The RVR is a fully programmable robot car that can be expanding with different…
Photography

Luminar’s libraries gain speed, drop need for you to manually import images

Luminar 3 just got a performance boost. Skylum Luminar 3.0.2 has improved speed over December's update, which added the long-promised libraries feature giving editors a Lightroom alternative.
Computing

Keep your portable computer safe and shiny with the best laptop bags for 2019

Choosing the right laptop bag is no easy feat -- after all, no one likes to second-guess themselves. Here are some of the best laptop bags on the market, from backpacks to sleeves, so you can get it right the first time around.