Elpida Announces Highest Density Server RAM

From Elpida’s news release:

The 2 Gigabyte modules are the highest density available for the server market, and they offer high-speed performance with a data transfer rate of 4.3 Gigabytes per second (PC2-4300). Elpida’s newly developed stacked BGA (sBGA) technology creates a slim module (4.8 millimeter thickness) that increases air flow space between modules, thus improving thermal performance and reliability for server applications.

“Elpida’s 2 Gigabyte DDR2 DIMMs combine the industry’s highest density modules with the maximum system performance available in the server market,” said Jun Kitano, director of Technical Marketing at Elpida Memory (USA). “Our new sBGA stacking technology allows component testing to occur prior to stacking, resulting in improved module production and better yields. Elpida’s ability to enhance production capability on high-density, high-performance modules demonstrates our readiness to meet customer demands for DDR2 DIMMs in volume quantities.”

2 Gigabyte DDR2 DIMM Features
Elpida’s new DIMMs (Part numbers: EBE21RD4ABHA-xx) are based on Elpida’s 512 Megabit DDR2 SDRAM devices that operate up to 533 Megabits per second (Mbps). The modules are organized as 256M words x 72-bits x 2 ranks, and they contain thirty-six 0.11 micron, 512 Megabit DDR2 devices that are stacked and mounted on the DIMMs using Elpida’s unique sBGA stacking technology. The mounted devices have a CAS latency (CL) of 3, 4, 5 with a burst length of 4, 8. The standard 240-pin DIMMs have a JEDEC-compliant outline with a slim thickness of 4.8 mm, and they support Error Checking and Correction (ECC) necessary for high-end server applications. The modules also offer 1.8V operation – one-half the power consumption over DDR.

The 2 Gigabyte DDR2 registered DIMM is part of Elpida’s comprehensive DDR2 product portfolio that also includes 512 Megabyte and 1 Gigabyte densities.

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